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kerumirembora

História da Bateria



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Buennas,

Sendo a Bateria um instrumento tão recente, nos ultimos tempos tenho-me vindo a interrogar... como é que a Bateria chegou ao que é hoje? de onde veio? como foi? por que mutações passou?

A ideia que tenho é que vem daqueles instrumentos de marcha presos ao colo utilizados pelos bombeiros e pelos militares...

Clues anyone?

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Perlux    0

É mais para os lados do que disse o wahit.... no fundo o primeiro instrumento a existir foi de percussão, quando os primatas e afins começaram a bater com cenas nas cabeças uns dos outros e viam que dava som lol..... não sei em concreto a história da bateria, mas vou dar uma vista de olhos nos meus apontamentos. Sei de algumas referencias e de alguns musicos que inovaram em certas áreas, mas vou ver....

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Iá, ok... ok... tem razão

Os tambores das tribos primatas evoluiram e foram dar no que hoje são os dejembés ou as congas...

Eu estava-me a referir à Bateria tal como ela é hoje, com tarola, pratos, bombo, timbalos, etc, etc... qual é o 1º registo que há de alguém sentado em frente a algo parecido ao que hoje é uma Bateria? para tocar o quê? quem? como? onde? porquê?

Não terá vindo dos Blues? Jazz?

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V8    2

Há um artigo muito bom na revista Promúsica (eu depois digo-vos o número) onde é feita uma retrospectiva muito interessante sobre a bateria e principais inovadores no instrumento.

Obrigatório.

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|Kandinsky|    0

Após ter pesquisado um pouco, encontrei o seguinte (quem não souber inglês que se cuide)...:

The standard drum set we know now exists since 1935. It was 'invented' in the USA, in New Orleans. It consists of a few different parts. These are: 



  



  Drums: 



2 or 3 tom-toms (or just 'toms') 



1 snare drum 



1 bass drum 



Cymbals: 



1 ride cymbal 



1 crash cymbal (2 on picture) 



2 Hi-Hat cymbals (not on picture) 



And lots of stands to keep thing together! 



 



 







But it took a while before a drum set looked like this one. A lot of different drums have been used in the past. Tribes in Africa took the trunk of a tree, hollowed it out and then spread the skin of an animal over it. If they wanted a more sharp sound, like our snare drum, they took the intestines of a pig and they stretched it under the skin. They used the drums for all kind of things. To alert the tribe for danger, or to pronounce things. Later, the Romans used drums in their armies. 







      It was in the 16th century that the Europeans took their drums to America. When they tried to conquer The New World, they took their colonists and armies (with all the instruments) to America. Later, he blacks, living in South America, were not allowed to play and create their own African drums. So they tried to combine drums with an African origin, like the snare and the tom-toms (but nobody remembered those were African drums from origin!). That first set looked about this: 







1 snare drum 



Chinese toms 



A horizontally placed bass drum 



Small cymbals 



A low Hi-Hat 



Chinese temple blocks 



In the 20th century, people began to play on such drums. Everybody started to play those African rhythms. And because the beats were played more and more on the cymbals, the size of the cymbals increased. The Chinese toms were replaced for Afro/European drums and the Hi-Hat had been enlarged to make it easy to play with your sticks. So bit by bit the drum set got its shape as it has now. Since 1950, innumerable technical changes has been made by Gretch, Rogers and later Sonor, Pearl and Tama, and many others. Cymbal specialists began to make cymbals for the new drums (Zildjian (since 1623) and Paiste, Ufip Sabian).

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Perlux    0
The modern drumset was not invented by one individual at one particular time or place. It evolved during the early part of the 20th century, with contributions by both musicians and instrument makers. 







By the 1890's, drummers in New Orleans (and elsewhere) were adapting the drums of the traditional military-style marching band to the stage, placing snare and bass drums so that both could be played by one player. At the same time, New Orleans musicians were developing a style of playing based on collective improvisation, later known as jazz. 







In 1909, drummer and instrument maker William F. Ludwig produced the first practical bass drum pedal. Although other mechanisms, controlled by foot or by hand, had existed for some years, Ludwig's pedal allowed the bass drum to be played more quickly and easily with the foot, freeing the player's hands to concentrate on the snare drum and other instruments. 







By 1920, a New Orleans drummer (such as Baby Dodds or Zutty Singleton) might be playing a set consisting of bass drum (possibly with attached cymbal and "clanger"), snare drum, Chinese tom-tom (with tacked-on heads), woodblock, cowbells, and small Chinese cymbals. Similar sets (often with the addition of sirens, whistles, birdcalls, air horns, etc.) were utilized by drummers playing for Vaudeville revues, circuses, and other theatrical performances. These were commonly referred to as "traps", a term generally thought to derive from "contraption" (but possibly from "trappings", according to James Blades in the Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments). 







In the early part of the 1920's, the "snowshoe" or "Charleston" foot pedal was making an appearance on the bandstand. This invention consisted of a hinged pair of foot-sized boards with small cymbals attached. Around 1925 drummers began using a "low boy" or "sock cymbal", a pair of small cymbals mounted on a low, spring-equipped stand operated by the foot. Around 1927, the first "high boys", or "high hat" cymbal stands appeared, enabling the drummer to play the cymbals with either the foot or the hands, or a combination of both (as mastered by drummers like Chick Webb and Jo Jones). 







By the 1930's, the drumset generally included a bass drum, snare drum, one or more tom-toms, Zildjian "Turkish" cymbals (larger and more resonant than Chinese cymbals), cowbell and woodblock. Of course each drummer would personalize the set with his own combination of "traps". Sonny Greer, for example, played a set with such additions as tympani, vibraphone, chimes, Chinese temple blocks and gongs. 







Throughout the 1930's and 1940's, drum manufacturers further refined and developed components of the set to meet the requirements of popular drummers such as Jo Jones and Gene Krupa, making larger tom-toms, "floor" toms, sturdier drum-mounted cymbal stands, and faster bass drum pedals. 







In the mid-1940's, the advent of bebop necessitated changes in drumming if not in the drumset itself. The quicker, more fluid melodic and harmonic style pioneered by Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker was paralleled by the development of a more melodic and independent rhythmic concept, exemplified by the innovations of drummers like Kenny Clarke, Max Roach and Art Blakey. Bass drums were a little smaller, cymbals a little larger, but the drumset of the swing era remained essentially unchanged. 







The drumset began growing again in the early 1950's with the addition of a second bass drum by Louie Bellson and others. 







In the late 50's, "Chick" Evans and Remo Belli each developed new plastic drumheads, freeing drummers from the weather-sensitive quirks of calfskin. 







To support (or compete with) the amplified guitar sound of the 60's, rock drummers moved once again toward deeper and heavier drums. The trend toward larger drumsets grew to outrageous proportions in the 70's as drummers added more toms and cymbals than any human could possibly play.



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